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Effects of aural atresia on speech development and learning: retrospective analysis from a multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic.

TitleEffects of aural atresia on speech development and learning: retrospective analysis from a multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsJensen DR, Grames LM, Lieu JEC
JournalJAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
Volume139
Issue8
Pagination797-802
Date Published2013 Aug 1
ISSN2168-619X
KeywordsChild, Child, Preschool, Congenital Abnormalities, Ear, Female, Hearing Loss, Bilateral, Hearing Loss, Conductive, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural, Humans, Language Development, Language Development Disorders, Learning, Male, Retrospective Studies, Speech Therapy
Abstract

<p>IMPORTANCE Aural atresia (AA) is associated with maximal conductive hearing loss in affected ears, and children with bilateral AA require amplification. Some recent research has suggested an increased risk for speech and learning problems among children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether increased risk for speech and learning problems exists among children with AA. DESIGN Retrospective medical record review. SETTING Multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic. PARTICIPANTS Children with unilateral or bilateral AA. INTERVENTIONS Records review, including evaluations by audiologists, speech pathologists, and psychologists. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Rates of speech and/or language delay, prevalence of speech therapy and educational interventions, and parental report of psychosocial problems. RESULTS A total of 74 patients were identified who met inclusion and exclusion criteria: 48 with right-sided AA, 19 with left-sided AA, and 7 with bilateral AA. Children with AA demonstrated high rates of speech therapy (86% among bilateral, 43% among unilateral). Reports of school problems were more common among children with right-sided AA (31%) than those with left-sided AA (11%) or bilateral AA (0%) (P = .06). Educational interventions were common in all groups (33% right, 21% left, 43% bilateral). In the case of bilateral AA, all children who received additional interventions were enrolled in schools for the hearing impaired, without any identified learning deficiencies. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Children with unilateral AA may be at greater risk of speech and learning difficulties than previously appreciated, similar to children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Whether amplification may alleviate this risk is unclear and warrants further study.</p>

DOI10.1001/jamaoto.2013.3859
Alternate JournalJAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
Citation KeyCK119
PubMed ID23868202