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Epidemiology of vertigo: a National Survey.

TitleEpidemiology of vertigo: a National Survey.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsLai Y-T, Wang T-C, Chuang L-J, Chen M-H, Wang P-C
JournalOtolaryngol Head Neck Surg
Volume145
Issue1
Pagination110-6
Date Published2011 Jul
ISSN1097-6817
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Resources, Health Surveys, Humans, Insurance Claim Review, Male, Middle Aged, Recurrence, Referral and Consultation, Risk Assessment, Seasons, Taiwan, Utilization Review, Vertigo
Abstract

<p><b>OBJECTIVE: </b>To investigate the epidemiology of vertigo among the general adult population in Taiwan using the National Health Insurance claims database.</p><p><b>STUDY DESIGN: </b>Cross-sectional study.</p><p><b>SETTING: </b>Data were retrieved from the 2006 National Health Insurance claims database.Subjects and Methods. Claims data were retrieved for patients 18 years or older with a diagnosis of vertigo (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 078.81, 386.XX, or 780.4) from January to December 2006. The authors describe the prevalence and recurrence of vertigo and the medical resource utilization associated with its treatment. Logistic regression models are used to assess the independent effects of age, sex, seasonal variation, institutional level of care, and specialty of care on the risk of vertigo recurrence.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>A total of 527,807 adult patients (mean ± SD age, 55.1 ± 17.3 years; 1:1.96 ratio of men to women) experienced vertigo in 2006. The prevalence of vertigo was 3.13 cases per 100 adults. Within 1 year of their index vertigo attack, 199,210 patients (37.7%) experienced recurrence. The prevalence and recurrence of vertigo increased significantly with age (P < .001 for both, x² test). Age, sex, seasonal variation, institutional level of care, and specialty of care had various effects on the risk of vertigo recurrence.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION: </b>Vertigo is a major health burden among the general adult population and tends to recur, particularly among older women</p>

DOI10.1177/0194599811400007
Alternate JournalOtolaryngol Head Neck Surg
Citation KeyCK62
PubMed ID21493319